BREW METHODS

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pour over

Manual pour over methods enable us to control every variable in the brewing process, allowing us to create a cup that highlights the unique characteristics of each coffee. Each and every Pour Over device has its own unique advantages, and requires adjustments to brewing parameters in order to be used correctly. These parameters include:

Grind

Both the size and the freshness of your grind are important. The finer (smaller) your grind, the more surface area there is to mass, increasing the rate of extraction. The inverse is true of a coarser (larger) grind. The coarser your grind, the less surface area there is to mass, decreasing the rate of extraction. Fresh, ground-to-order coffee preserves volatile aromatics and reduces oxidation, which causes staling and can result in a flat cup.

temperature

Water used to brew coffee should be heated between 195-205 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures lower than 195 degrees can result in larger sugars not becoming soluble enough during the brewing process, resulting in an under-extracted cup. Temperatures higher than 205 degrees can result in larger tannic and bitter tasting compounds becoming too soluble, making it easier to extract them, potentially resulting in an over-extracted cup.

Agitation

There are two ways agitation is imparted on the bed of coffee grounds while brewing a cup of coffee. The first requires the manual stirring of the coffee grounds using a spoon or wooden paddle. This method is difficult to replicate between baristi, as the amount of force and the number of times stirred all make an impact in the finished cup. The second is the impact of water falling onto the bed of coffee grounds. This is an unavoidable part of brewing a cup of coffee. Flow restricted kettles are used to control the rate at which water can be poured onto the bed of coffee grounds, increasing the consistency between each barista.

 

Brew Ratio

Brew ratio is defined as the ratio of ground coffee to water used to brew a cup of coffee. The brew ratio determines the concentration and the extraction potential of the final cup. If the ratio is too low, the finished cup will be strong and under-extracted. If the ratio is too high, the finished cup will be weak and over-extracted. Finding a balance is key when preparing a great cup of coffee. Taking all of your brewing parameters into consideration is crucial when determining this ratio.

Brew Time

Brew time is the amount of time water is in contact with the coffee grounds while brewing a cup of coffee. Too much contact time can result in over-extraction, while too little can result in under-extraction. With pour-over brewing methods, brew time changes dependent on others parameters. Specifically, as grind size changes, the flow of water through the bed of coffee increases or decreases, impacting the total time water is in contact with the coffee grounds.

Water

A cup of coffee is composed of 1-2% coffee solubles; the other 98-99% is simply water. Brewing coffee with filtered water free of odor or off-flavors is imperative to making a delicious cup of coffee. Regardless of the quality of the beans, a great cup of coffee cannot be achieved without great water.

 
 Photo Credit Ty Nigh - https://www.flickr.com/photos/tynigh/5373788749

Photo Credit Ty Nigh - https://www.flickr.com/photos/tynigh/5373788749

Chemex (Able Kone)

The Kone is a stainless steel, cone shaped filter designed for use in a Chemex server.  The porous nature of the Kone results in a cup that has more body and oils, like a cleaned up French press cup. The single cup uses 28 grams of coffee to 315 grams of water, while the Chemex for Two uses 56 grams of coffee to 625 grams of water.

Single Cup Process:

  1. Place your Chemex server on your scale. Turn on your scale.

  2. Fill your kettle with hot water.

  3. Using your kettle, rinse the Chemex thoroughly with hot water.

  4. Weigh out and grind 28 grams of coffee.

  5. Empty the Chemex and kettle of any pre-heat water.

  6. Place the Kone filter in the top of the Chemex.  Add the ground coffee to the Kone. Tare your scale.

  7. Fill your kettle with hot water.

  8. Using your kettle, pour 80 grams of water over the grounds. The goal is even saturation. This step allows the coffee to de-gas, which enables maximum extraction.

  9. Start your timer.

  10. At 0:45 very slowly pour water straight down into the center of the coffee bed. Avoid the sides of the Kone by keeping the stream focused on the middle in a straight pour. Your total water weight (315 grams) should be reached at 1:45.

Your extraction should complete before or at 2:45.

 
 Photo Credit Olgierd Rudak - https://www.flickr.com/photos/olgierd/31187297112

Photo Credit Olgierd Rudak - https://www.flickr.com/photos/olgierd/31187297112

Kalita Wave

The Kalita wave is a cone-shaped dripper with a flat bottom. The ridges in the filter and the cross bar at the bottom are designed to keep the filter from sticking to the walls and bottom of the brewing device, allowing gases released during the brewing process to move through the filter rather than the brew bed. Furthermore, the 3 small holes limit the rate at which coffee is able to exit the dripper. This leads to increased contact time with the coffee, higher extraction rates, and less channeling. The paper filter prevents oils and sediment from getting into the finished product, resulting in a clean cup with tremendous flavor clarity.

Process:

  1. Place your Kalita and carafe or mug on your scale. Turn your scale on.

  2. Fill your kettle with hot water.

  3. Take a Kalita paper filter and set it into the dripper. Using your kettle, rinse thoroughly with hot water.  This will ensure no papery taste resides in the finished brew, and will also heat the ceramic cone and the carafe or mug you are brewing into.

  4. Weigh out and grind 23 grams of coffee.

  5. Empty the carafe and your kettle of any pre-heat water.

  6. Fill your kettle with NEW hot water.

  7. Add the ground coffee to the filter, shake and tap the Kalita until the coffee bed is level. Rest it back on the carafe and tare your scale.

  8. Using your kettle, pour ~ 50 grams of water over the grounds.  The goal is even saturation so pour slowly in a spiral pattern.  This step allows the coffee to de-gas, which enables maximum extraction.

  9. Start your timer.

  10. At 0:30 pour more water over the grounds. Again, pour in a spiral pattern. Start your pour in the center, working your way outwards to a few centimeters from the edge of the slurry, and then back to the center. Repeat as many times as necessary to reach 350 grams. Keep water level high. This ensures temperature stability and keeps the agitation from pouring constant.

Your brew should finish between 2:45 and 3:30.

 

 Photo Credit Don LaVange - https://www.flickr.com/photos/wickenden/7451577516

Photo Credit Don LaVange - https://www.flickr.com/photos/wickenden/7451577516

French Press

Process:

  1. Rinse French press with hot water to pre heat brewer

  2. Fill French Press 1/3 with hot water.

  3. Dose coffee into French press.

  4. Start timer for four minutes

  5. Add remainder of water up to the top of the silver band. Try to wet all grounds.

  6. Place lid on to retain heat but do not let it contact the grounds.

  7. One minute into brewing, remove lid and gently swirl the press until the crust formed at top at least partially breaks.

  8. If needed, wipe any excess ground from the spout area with sanitary linen.

  9. Replace lid.

  1. At four minutes, gently press the plunger down. It should take 15-20 seconds.